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Posts Tagged ‘anger’

Finally getting around to April’s Tabletalk magazine, there was an article by John Piper which discussing anger and means to crushing it. I found it very convicting but helpful. I can struggle with letting the desire for ease, comfort, and respect lead to anger when my children are not making my life any easier or don’t seem to be tracking with my intent for them. I definitely have seen God’s work in this area of my life over the past 2-3 years but I still have a long way to go. Piper gives 9 things to ponder when struggling with anger:

First, ponder the rights of Christ to be angry, but then how He endured the cross, as an example of long-suffering (1 Peter 2:21).

Second, ponder how much you have been forgiven and how much mercy you have been shown. (Eph. 4:32)

Third, ponder your own sinfulness and take the beam out of your own eye:  (Matt. 7:3–5).

Fourth, think about how you do not want to give place to the Devil, because harbored anger is the one thing the Bible explicitly says opens a door and invites him in:  (Eph. 4:26–27).

Fifth, ponder the folly of your own self-immolation, that is, numerous detrimental effects of anger to the one who is angry — some spiritual, some mental, some physical, and some relational: (Prov. 3:7–8)

Sixth, confess your sin of anger to some trusted friend, as well as to the offender, if possible. (James 5:16).

Seventh, let your anger be the key to unlock the dungeons of pride and self-pity in your heart and replace them with love: (1 Cor. 13:4–7).

Eighth, remember that God is going to work it all for your good as you trust in His future grace. Your offender is even doing you good, if you will respond with love: (Rom. 8:28) (James 1:2–4).

Ninth, remember that God will vindicate your just cause and settle all accounts better than you could. Either your offender will pay in hell or Christ has paid for him. Your payback would be double jeopardy or an offence to the cross: (Rom. 12:19) (1 Peter 2:23).

Read the entire article here. Also check out these worthwhile articles from April’s issue as well:

The Victory Parade We Don’t Deserve by R.C. Sproul Jr.

He explained to Joshua this most fundamental truth: “The question, Joshua, is not whether or not I am on your side or theirs. The question is whether or not you are on My side.”

Young Women, Idolatry & the Powerful Gospel by Elyse Fitzpatrick

The antidote to idolatrous worship isn’t found in rules prohibiting idolatry. Rules don’t dazzle and captivate. They can’t generate worship. They’re not powerful enough to transform.

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This week: a key part of the battle with anger, a key trait of a good teacher, how the quality of movies is declining, and the current cultural striving for perfection.

The Angry Person: Always the Last to Know (by Ed Welch)

The problem with anger is that those who don’t have the problem take it to heart; those who are angry are confident in their right-ness and over time can become massively, utterly, completely deluded, blind and (this is no exaggeration) can feel quite good about themselves after bludgeoning someone close them, as if they have set the world aright. Arrgghh. I hate anger.

The Key Trait of Successful Teachers (by Will Bankston)

Hendricks recalls an encounter with one of his own professors who models well the humble service of Christ. The professor’s habit of studying both early in the morning and late into the night piqued Hendricks’s curiosity. When he asked his professor about this practice, the professor replied, “Son, I would rather have my students drink from a running stream than a stagnant pool.”

The Day the Movies Died (by Mark Harris)

It has always been disheartening when good movies flop; it gives endless comfort to those who would rather not have to try to make them and can happily take cover behind a shield labeled "The people have spoken." But it’s really bad news when the industry essentially rejects a success, when a movie that should have spawned two dozen taste-based gambles on passion projects is instead greeted as an unanswerable anomaly. That kind of thinking is why Hollywood studio filmmaking, as 2010 came to its end, was at an all-time low—by which I don’t mean that there are fewer really good movies than ever before (last year had its share, and so will 2011) but that it has never been harder for an intelligent, moderately budgeted, original movie aimed at adults to get onto movie screens nationwide.

James Franco and Bradley Cooper are More Perfect Than You (Mockingbird Blog)

This idea (that man is perfectible and so should strive for perfection) has been around for 2,000 years, but it has lately been streamlined and turbo-charged: in its contemporary incarnation, it regards any unfulfilled human potentialities as a particularly sad and sclerotic form of entropy.

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