Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘david murray’

This week: twin pregnancy reductions, Christianity and the Crusades, spiritual entropy and big oil.

my twin girls

As a dad of 2 sets of twin girls, none of whom I could imagine my life without, it’s discouraging that this is where we’re at now:

The Two-Minus-One Pregnancy (by Ruth Padawer, NY Times)

What is it about terminating half a twin pregnancy that seems more controversial than reducing triplets to twins or aborting a single fetus? After all, the math’s the same either way: one fewer fetus. Perhaps it’s because twin reduction (unlike abortion) involves selecting one fetus over another, when either one is equally wanted.

Was Christianity responsible for the crusades? (by David Murray)

It is very easy to fingerpoint at Christians of another generation. If the crusading Christians could see how self-serving, worldly, inconsiderate, gender-confused, lazy, and demanding the Christians of today are, I certainly hope that they would not think that our "Christianity" is responsible for that!

Spiritual Entropy, or: The Second Law of Thermodynamics and the Fallacy of Self-Help Christianity
(by Mockingbird)

Trying to ‘will’ ourselves to spirituality by adhering to some form of law will always fail–we will tend to either stay the same or get worse, but certainly no better. Willpower is insufficient to overcome the natural decay of life. If we are left to our own devices, we tend to degenerate.

On Feeling Sorry for Exxon (by Doug Wilson)

For every gallon of gas that is sold in the United States, on average, the local, state and federal taxes come out to 48 cents. The average profit taken away from every gallon of gas by Exxon is –brace yourselves for unsavory news about the oil buccaneers — 2 cents.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

This week: an encouraging article about a father, rethinking spiritual growth, ministry without spirituality, and the forging of an excellent wife.

My Father’s Stunning Failure to Achieve (by S.D. Smith)

But he’s the best man I know. He’s been an exemplary father and has served people of many colors and languages on several continents. He is a beautiful man.

How many High Achiever stories have you read with the tragic footnote that the person lost their kids and ruined their families? Too many.

I’ll take my Dad. I’ll take him, receive him, for what he is and has been: a gift from a far better Father.

Rethinking Spiritual Growth (by Tullian Tchividjian)

But can it be, perhaps, that it is precisely the unconditional gift of grace that helps me to see and admit all that? I hope so. The grace of God should lead us to see the truth about ourselves, and to gain a certain lucidity, a certain humor, a certain down-to-earthness.

Remember, the Apostle Paul referred to himself as the chief of sinners at the end of his life. It was his ability to freely admit that which demonstrated his spiritual maturity—he had nothing to prove or protect because it wasn’t about him!

God’s been hunting me down (by David Murray)

Let me summarize where I believe I erred: ministry without spirituality. Perfunctory and spiritual disciplines and going from one ministry activity to another to another to another, with hardly a moment to feel dependence upon God, cry for help, and seek the Lord’s blessing before, during, or after.

An Excellent Wife is Forged, Not Found (by Jennifer Smidt)

A godly woman becomes an excellent wife as she understands she is made in the image of God, re-made in the image of Christ and formed over a lifetime of repentance and redemption. Excellence is not measured by a to-do list; it is manifested in the life of a wife who knows Jesus intimately.

Read Full Post »

Ghosts in Arizona Tragedy (by Sarah Pulliam Bailey, GetReligion.org)

I have to note how weird it was to keep hearing the broadcasters say “There is no indication this is a terrorist attack.” Really? When you attempt to kill a politician and take out dozens of innocent bystanders, that’s not a terrorist attack? It seems to me that what the journalists meant was “There is no indication that this man is motivated by Muslim extremism.” It’s a good reminder of why it’s important to not use “terrorist” as a euphemism or otherwise confuse the issues or downplay when religion plays a role in a given terror attack.

39 Percent Of NYC Pregnancies Result In Abortion (from CBS New York)

In 2009, there were 225,667 pregnancies in the City with 126,774 resulting in live births and 87,273 resulting in abortions. In addition to those abortion numbers, there were 11,620 spontaneous terminations.

Sheep: “This time it’s personal” (by David Murray)

Have you ever tried to move a sheep? It’s like trying to move an elephant. Ever watched a shepherd try to maneuver a sheep into a fold or a dip-tank. It’s like trying to wrestle with a devil. Half a dozen sheep invaded my garden once. I thought it would be easy to hustle them out the wide gate again. But it was as if an electric shield (visible only to sheep) stretched across the gap. I could get them to go anywhere and everywhere, but through that gate.

5 New Paradigms for a Socially Engaged Company (by Soren Gordhamer, Mashable)

Companies are realizing that it is not enough to get people to show up to work; the real challenge is creating cultures that enhance creativity and innovation. Below you’ll find what leaders in the field had to say about this new age of innovation and engagement.

The Liking-Wanting Distinction and Self-Esteem Addiction (from the Mockingbird blog)

As it’s wisely been pointed out, the self-esteem movement is a losing game, regardless of how it’s played – human need is a bottomless pit. To paraphrase Gerhard Forde, who was paraphrasing Martin Luther, the thirst for glory needs to be extinguished rather than sated.

How Do You Read a Book? (by Ray Pennoyer)

No matter how young you are, or how long you live, if you love books you will never be able to get to the bottom of your “want to read” list. To top it off I am a relatively slow reader, which is an additional handicap for me. However, when I get discouraged I remember the advice I received in one of my seminary classes – it may go back to one of the Reformers or possibly Erasmus. He said that true learning comes not from the quantity of books, but in “knowing a few great books well.”

Read Full Post »