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Posts Tagged ‘management’

This week: Chris Paul and forgiveness, Lost, a Christian view of work and management from Ephesians 6, and John Piper on the death of Osama Bin Laden.

Chris Paul

The lessons of Nathaniel Jones (by Rick Reilly)

It’s something Paul told me during a "Homecoming" episode once on ESPN, and every time I watch him play I can’t get it out of my mind. Paul, now 25, said: "These guys were 14 and 15 years old [at the time], with a lot of life ahead of them. I wish I could talk to them and tell them, ‘I forgive you. Honestly.’ I hate to know that they’re going to be in jail for such a long time. I hate it."

A Christian View of Management in Ephesians 6:5-9 (by Matt Perman)

One thing I’ve noticed about most Christian teaching on work is that it is pretty thin. It essentially boils down to “work hard” and “be honest.” Those are very important things. But, to be frank, they aren’t very interesting. And, they don’t give guidance to the wide range of issues that the modern worker truly has to deal with.

Lost is Found (The Curator)

And when that journey is complete, when one is purified of weakness and learns to empty themselves, we arrive at love, just as in Season 6 all the characters arrive at this place they longed for—of love and community.  And that is what really made this show for me.  I know some people complained that not all the questions about the Island’s mysteries were answered.  In some ways I couldn’t care less. 

Is God Glad Osama Bin Laden’s Dead? (by John Piper)

In response to Osama bin Laden’s death, quite a few tweets and blogs have cited the biblical truth that “God does not delight in the death of the wicked.” That is true.
It is also true that God does delight in the death of the wicked. There are things about every death that God approves in themselves and things about every death that God disapproves in themselves.

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This week: Mark Altrogge sharing some thoughts about depression from his wife’s 20 year battle with it, the failure of moral effort, being a resource to those you manage, and believing the reliability and accuracy of the Bible.

20 years of Depression (by Mark Altrogge)

My sweet wife, who was normally lighthearted and cheerful, sat there with a hopeless expression on her face.  Her eyes looked dark and empty to me.  She was unable to be around people.  She was completely incapacitated.  She was suffering pain I couldn’t fathom.

I didn’t know what was going on.  I thought it was a demonic attack.  I fasted and prayed and rebuked the enemy.  I thought it must somehow be my fault, that I wasn’t leading and caring for my wife somehow.  I thought I might have to step down from being a pastor.

The Absolute Failure of Moral Effort (by Zach Nielsen quoting Tim Keller)

Here is a great dialectical tension. Until you know your works are not any good, they are not any good. As soon as you realize that they are not any good there is at least a germ of something real, which is, you are doing it for God’s sake. You are doing it out of faith. You are not doing it out of fear that you are going to lose something or out of pride (now I know I am better than other people).

Be a Resource, Not a Limiter (by Matt Perman)

If you manage in a certain way (namely, with a command and control focus), you incentivize compliance. But if you realize that management is not about control, but rather about helping to unleash the talents of your people for the performance of the organization, and that this comes from trusting your people and granting them autonomy, then you see yourself not as the “boss,” but as a source of help.

Why I Believe the Bible (by Jim Hamilton)

Helped through the storm by the Schreiner-rock, I began to look more closely at what I thought were the hardest cases. I was not at all impressed with the actual argument against the historical accuracy and reliability of the Bible. In fact, I think you would have to know far more than any human being could ever know to be in position to declare definitively that the Bible is in error. Would it be harsh to summarize the argument against the Bible as the whining of rebels?

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