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Posts Tagged ‘rabbit room’

You’ve heard it all before: the movies are never as good as the book they are based on. But here’s the rub: reading is a very solitary experience. It’s just you and the author engaging in the story. When I finished the very last book in the Harry Potter series (the Deathly Hallows), it was pretty anticlimactic. It was a tremendous finish with certain secrets revealed and a very stirring end in the choices Harry makes. But I read it alone. Even when my wife read it shortly after I finished, it was different. Sure, we discussed it, but it didn’t feel like a shared experience. There’s something about closing out a series on the big screen. Maybe I’m too real time now with the advent of Twitter and the internet. It’s likely me being a product of my culture, but seeing a film with the anticipation that this one brought on with my wife on the opening Friday in a packed theater was a blast that was a fitting end to the series.

I don’t want to spoil it too much but the ending sequence starting with Snape’s argument with Voldemort and leading to the last crucial horcrux was everything I imagined it and better. Yes, they changed the ending a little and added to the drama, but I appreciate how the writers knew the significance of the ending and did not rush through it on screen. I was very impatient watching this film, I kept wanting it to speed up, but director built and built and built with solid precision.

The epilogue was too much though. If you’ve seen it, you know exactly what I mean.

I want to say more about Harry Potter and the story and the gospel within but I’ll save that for another time. Let’s just say that I’m a big fan. For now, check out some excellent articles below on Harry and the stories within…

From the Rabbit Room:

Harry Potter, Jesus, and Me by Andrew Peterson

What We’ve Learned From Harry, Part 1 by Travis Prinzi

What We’ve Learned From Harry, Part 2 by Travis Prinzi

From Mockingbird

The Seven Sacraments of Harry Potter:

Part 1: The Scar

Part 2: The Mirror of Erised

Part 3: The Dementor

Part 4: The Pensieve

Part 5: The Mudblood

Part 6: The Horcrux

Part 7: The Deathly Hallows

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This week: Harry Potter & Jesus, the most risky profession: pastor, the blessed trials of being a parent, and the calling of motherhood.

Harry Potter, Jesus, and Me

Harry Potter, Jesus, and Me (by Andrew Peterson, Rabbit Room)

As for the witchcraft debate, I heave a weary sigh. No, God doesn’t want us to practice witchcraft. Of course he doesn’t. I’ve read arguments on both sides of this, and believe we could spar for days without doing a lick of good. (By the way, no debate is raging over Glenda the Good Witch of the East in The Wizard of Oz. Most Americans have probably seen that film and/or read that book, and didn’t start conducting séances on the weekends—though the flying monkeys have crept me out for years. And Oz, when compared to Potter, is practically bereft of Christian meaning.)

The Most Risky Profession (by Mark Galli, CT)

That very name suggests that perhaps the church should not be about growth and efficiency, but care and concern, not so much an organization but a community, not something that mimics our high-tech culture but something that incarnates a high-touch fellowship. By God’s grace, there is a remnant of such churches alive and well today, with leaders who really are pastors.

The Best Fears of Our Lives (by Russell Moore, Touchstone)

According to the Sacramento Bee’s report,“Parents experience significantly higher levels of depression than grown-ups who don’t have children.”

I still thought I was okay, since I’m a reasonably happy man. That is, until I saw the definition of the problem. According to theBee:“The researchers suggest that worry is a lifelong cost of having children.” And don’t think it gets better when they leave the house: “Parents of grown children (whether they live at home or have moved out) and parents without custody of minor children exhibit more signs of depression than other parents.”

Motherhood Is a Calling (And Where Your Children Rank) (by Rachel Jankovic)

Everywhere you go, people want to talk about your children. Why you shouldn’t have had them, how you could have prevented them, and why they would never do what you have done. They want to make sure you know that you won’t be smiling anymore when they are teenagers. All this at the grocery store, in line, while your children listen.

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This week: an encouraging article about a father, rethinking spiritual growth, ministry without spirituality, and the forging of an excellent wife.

My Father’s Stunning Failure to Achieve (by S.D. Smith)

But he’s the best man I know. He’s been an exemplary father and has served people of many colors and languages on several continents. He is a beautiful man.

How many High Achiever stories have you read with the tragic footnote that the person lost their kids and ruined their families? Too many.

I’ll take my Dad. I’ll take him, receive him, for what he is and has been: a gift from a far better Father.

Rethinking Spiritual Growth (by Tullian Tchividjian)

But can it be, perhaps, that it is precisely the unconditional gift of grace that helps me to see and admit all that? I hope so. The grace of God should lead us to see the truth about ourselves, and to gain a certain lucidity, a certain humor, a certain down-to-earthness.

Remember, the Apostle Paul referred to himself as the chief of sinners at the end of his life. It was his ability to freely admit that which demonstrated his spiritual maturity—he had nothing to prove or protect because it wasn’t about him!

God’s been hunting me down (by David Murray)

Let me summarize where I believe I erred: ministry without spirituality. Perfunctory and spiritual disciplines and going from one ministry activity to another to another to another, with hardly a moment to feel dependence upon God, cry for help, and seek the Lord’s blessing before, during, or after.

An Excellent Wife is Forged, Not Found (by Jennifer Smidt)

A godly woman becomes an excellent wife as she understands she is made in the image of God, re-made in the image of Christ and formed over a lifetime of repentance and redemption. Excellence is not measured by a to-do list; it is manifested in the life of a wife who knows Jesus intimately.

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