Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘ross douthat’

I usually share out encouraging and worthwhile reads that I find during the week over Twitter or Google Reader. However, I thought it might be helpful to weed through those a bit and share my favorites of the week. This week: Piper on Jesus as mediator, Douthat on the abortion paradox of our culture, Baxter on fighting sin, Keller on Christians and culture, and Wilson on technology.

Don’t Make Jesus More of a Mediator Than He is (by John Piper)

This is astonishing. Jesus is warning us not to think of God Almighty as unwilling to receive us directly into his presence. By “directly” I mean what Jesus meant when he said, “I am not going to take your requests to God for you. You may take them directly. He loves you. He wants you to come. He is not angry at you.”

The Unborn Paradox (by Ross Douthat, NY Times)

This is the paradox of America’s unborn. No life is so desperately sought after, so hungrily desired, so carefully nurtured. And yet no life is so legally unprotected, and so frequently destroyed.

Directions for Hating Sin (by Richard Baxter)

Think well what pure and sweet delights a holy soul may enjoy from God, in his holy service; and then you will see what sin is, which robs him of these delights, and prefers fleshly lusts before them.

Work and Cultural Renewal (by Tim Keller)

The most powerful way to show people the truth of Christianity is to serve the common good. The monks in the Middle Ages moved out through pagan Europe, inventing and establishing academies, universities, and hospitals. They transformed local economies and cared for the weak through these new institutions. They didn’t set out to ‘get control’ of a pagan culture. They let the gospel change how they did their work and that meant they worked for others rather than for themselves. Christians today should be aiming for the same thing.

Calvinism, Eschatology, and the New Media (by Douglas Wilson)

The constant and ever present temptation in the Church is the gnostic temptation of locating sin in the stuff, sin in the matter, sin in the wealth, sin in the technology . . . instead of locating it where it belongs, in the heart of man.

Read Full Post »