Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘wives’

This week: more grace than sin, dealing with mistreatment, the true testing ground for a wife, and glorifying God at work.

Jesus: More Full of Grace Than I of Sin (by Justin Taylor)

O Jesus, full of truth and grace

More full of grace than I of sin
Yet once again I seek Thy face:
Open Thine arms and take me in
And freely my backslidings heal
And love the faithless sinner still.

– Charles Wesley

When Others Mistreat You (by Nathan Busenitz, the Cripplegate)

For the truth is, if you are wronged by other men, you have the better of it, for it is better to bear wrong than to do wrong a great deal. If they wrong you, you are in a better condition than they, because it is better to bear, than to do wrong.

A Wife’s Testing Ground (by Jen Smidt, The Resurgence)

If our value is tied to his purity, we will be devastated. If our security is grounded in his job title, we will be shaken. If our faith rides the coattails of his, we will find ourselves drowning in unbelief.

If our husband is our rock, we may be crushed by him.

How to Glorify God at Work (by John Piper, Desiring God)

Go to work utterly dependent on God (Proverbs 3:5-6; John 15:5). Without him you can’t breathe, move, think, feel, or talk. Not to mention be spiritually influential. Get up in the morning and let God know your desperation for him. Pray for help.

Read Full Post »

This week: date nights and devotions, mission to the suburbs, more on female identity from Wendy Alsup, and a postscript on the resurrection from Kevin DeYoung.

Open Bible

Date Nights & Devotions (by Tim Challies)

What if the point of devotions is less about learning about God and more about spending time with God? What if it’s less about Bible study and more about building relational intimacy? What would change about our devotions if instead of trying to learn about God, we focused instead on spending time with God, time spent hearing from him through his Word and speaking to him through prayer? If this is the case it doesn’t much matter what we remember at the end of it because the joy has been in the moment, the value has been in the time spent together.

Mission: Suburbs (by Casey Cease)

The question is whether you will make disciples as you go, or will you wait for other, more professional people, to do it for you?  Let’s not fall into the suburban stereotype of outsourcing local missions, rather, let us invest into our communities, connect with our neighbors, and continually strive to be intentional about seeing lives transformed by Jesus.

The Gospel and the Bikini Barista (by Wendy Alsup)

We have adopted many Christ-less coping mechanisms for dealing with these desires the curse predicts. Instead of finding in God love and affirmation that satisfies, we have in our craving apart from Christ repeatedly carved out cisterns for ourselves, “broken cisterns that can hold no water” (Jer. 2:13). For some it’s control and manipulation. I’ve been there, especially in my marriage. I thought if I manipulated things, I could get my husband to better meet my needs. But manipulation and attempts at control are as ineffective for meeting the needs in my heart as the bikini barista’s are for hers.

A Resurrection Postscript: Saved by Justice (by Kevin DeYoung)

The resurrection is not a sentimental story about never giving up, or the possibility of good coming from evil. It is not first of all a story about how suffering can be sanctified, or a story of how Jesus suffered for all of humanity so we can suffer with the rest of humanity. The resurrection is the loud declaration that Jesus is enough–enough to atone for your sins, enough to reconcile you to God, enough to present you holy in God’s presence, enough to free you from the curse of the law, enough to promise you there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.

Read Full Post »

This week: Is Hitchens right that eternity is unbearable? Some thoughts on being a complementarian, and what it means to know and be known by a well-known blogger and now pastor.

Chris Hitchens

Future Imperfect: Will Heaven Be Intolerable? (by Barry Cooper)

…Hitchens allows himself a small loophole – “Anything eternal is probably intolerable” – and I think he’s right to do so.

Is it possible that eternal things seem intolerable to us because in this world nothing is? Might we lack a reasonable sense of what eternity will be like because we’ve never experienced anything that comes close? We tend to think of a single day endlessly multiplied, and soon, our mental picture of heaven resembles one of those imaginary prisons conjured up by Piranesi when he was feeling a bit peaky. Even a good party, as Hitchens rightly notes, becomes insufferable as soon as it becomes inescapable.

Confessions of a Conflicted Complementarian (by Wendy Alsup)

After I had kids, I looked around at the godly women in my life. So few looked like my earlier naive notions of the good Christian woman. Were their life circumstances mistakes? Were they doomed to substandard application of Biblical instructions to women because of the way their life had turned out?

“Dora the Doormat” and other Scary Straw Women of Complementarity (by Mary Kassian)

Recently, someone in the twitter world called me an “uber-complementarian.” They threw out the term “complementarian” derogatorily, like an ugly handful of mud – akin to calling someone a “racist,” “fascist,” “sexist,” or something scary like that. I had to smile, since I remember sitting around a table with John Piper and Wayne Grudem and others, wracking our brains to come up with an apt label to describe the historic Christian teaching on gender. Oh how quickly labels turn into stereotypes!

To Know and To Be Known (by Tim Challies)

What if all the blog readers are impressed but my wife is entirely unimpressed? There are many pastors who are loved all around the world but who have earned very little respect in their own church. There are many men who are admired far and wide but whose wife and children struggle to find any reason to respect them.

Read Full Post »